How Kitchen Islands Are Shaping The Future Of Kitchens

More than just expanding cabinet storage and countertop surfaces, kitchen islands have evolved into a gathering spot where family and guests hang around. Island design and comfort now draws cooks and visitors together to increase functionality, aesthetics and socialization. Along with food preparation and meals, kitchens are more open. Kids do homework and adults take care of paperwork. Additional activities like these promote family time as meals are prepared. For those whose children have moved away from home, this time goes to enjoying a glass of wine with guests before dinner gets to the table. And dinner is more likely to stay at the island with more comfortable seating. Still used for storage and counter space, islands also accommodate appliances like stoves with downward vents. And don’t forget about sinks where approximately 90% of the time is spent. The convenience of doing multiple tasks in one place shortens steps and work time. The ability to socialize more makes everything feel easier. Universal Design further expands function with varying countertop heights. This enables anyone at any height, especially children, to participate in food preparation and other activities without having to climb stools or reach overhead. Incorporating different materials from the rest of the kitchen adds even more appeal. One way is to use fabrics for surrounding stools and chairs. Fabrics contrast well with hard surfaces to soften the overall look. As a result, islands stand out as design objects and look more like furniture that seamlessly blends into the living room. The future will see more variation in island shapes and heights. Seating room will be expanded and rather than...

How to Add Ambiance (And Safety) to Your Kitchen

Universal Design is an interior design that adapts homes to homeowners, not the other way around. The goal is to make the entire home safe and easy to use. When it comes to kitchens, here’s one design tip that adapts your kitchen to your needs plus transforms it into a dining area with ambiance. You’ll be amazed to see how one small addition to your cabinetry can make such a difference. When it comes to base cabinets, most manufacturers include an indentation to make room for your feet called the toe kick space. Typically 3 inches deep and about 3 1/2 inches high, this space allows people to stand closer to the countertop so they don’t have to lean forward. Standing closer puts less strain on the back, shoulders and arms and minimizes discomfort, posture issues and chronic pain. The addition of light to this space adds both safety and ambiance. Here’s how. First, it clearly defines the break from floor to cabinets.  Especially advantageous at night, you minimize the possibility of bumping into things. This definition also aids early morning and evening meal preparation. Another advantage is that lighting placed within the toe kick can’t cause a glare. One goal of Universal Design is to balance lighting. It doesn’t matter if you have 20/20 vision, wear glasses or have a family member with sight issues; too much light is just as dangerous as too little. Foot level lighting balances overhead lighting and the combination eliminates shadows. Finally, toe kick lighting sets the ambiance of a kitchen. The soft glow creates an atmosphere that makes your meal more relaxed…...

The Kitchen Island – How It Defines The Busiest Room In The House

There was a time when “kitchen islands” consisted of sturdy tables set in the center of the room and… only in kitchens large enough to accommodate them. In the 1930s, Frank Lloyd Wright brought kitchen islands to suburban homes with his “open plan” living space. They have continued to evolve ever since. Currently, the island has literally become the hub of our homes for doing more tasks than just cooking. They’ve become the center for socialization. If you’re looking to modify an island already in place or add one to your kitchen, it’s best to work with a professional to draw up a floor plan. An island should have about three feet of space around it. If it’s too large, the kitchen becomes crowded. Too small and not only does it not look good, it may not fit in with the normal workflow. Bottom line, it shouldn’t be too close to doors or other countertops but you don’t want it to be standing off by itself. The next consideration is how you want to use it. Islands can be strictly functional by providing additional countertop space and storage. But as suggested above, islands are where people interact. While the cook is chopping tomatoes, he can talk to family about their day, help the kids do homework, and just show off a little as guests nibble on appetizers as dinner is prepared.  This brings up the question of how many people do you want to be able to sit around it?  And do you want one level or two? Take a look at our Projects to see what we can...