Ordinary to Extraordinary

Because kitchens are so complex, even minor changes redefine its appearance. It’s why mixing metals, glass and lighting are such good tools for a custom look. Even relatively small details establish a kitchen “aura” that’s distinctly your own. For example, when it comes to hardware, mix finishes such as satin nickel, polished chrome or nickel, and oil-rubbed bronze for faucets, cup and bar pulls. To get started, consider using different metals to complement different cabinet types. This mix now opens more options for the hardware around your sink. The same applies to lighting. Whether you prefer chandelier, drop down or ceiling mounted lighting, there’s no reason why you can’t incorporate more than one style. The goal is to have enough light while creating an atmosphere the whole family can relate to. Our network of resources gives you access to hundreds of vendors and manufacturers world-wide. There’s almost no limit to what can be done to make any kitchen the best it can be. Use the Cornerstone Cabinet Company experience and expertise to find the right combination for...

4 Breakfast Nooks Sure to Wake You Up

We all know that if you start your day off on the right foot, the rest will likely fall into place. A sunny, cheerful breakfast nook is a great way to hedge your bets. Here, four dedicated breakfast spots show how you can kick-start your morning no matter what your style. Read the article here....

Beautiful Wood Bar

Wood cabinets aren’t just for kitchens! Take a look at this bar that Cornerstone customized for a client. Wonderful detailing on the backdrop to make this a focus of a large room. Lots of function and storage for the bar...

Trends in Countertop Materials

When it comes to upgrading your kitchen, countertops play a crucial role in your kitchen’s function and appearance. As recently as the late 1980s, granite was still relatively unknown and little used.  That changed quickly and although its natural beauty is still popular, the rise of quartz with its more contemporary and consistent patterns gives you more options to customize your space. Quartz is a mineral and one of the most abundant on the planet. To make in into countertops, it’s crushed and mixed with resin and color additives. That’s why you have so many colors and patterns to choose from, including natural looks that feel as though they come from Mother Nature. Along with looks, quartz offers a number of practical advantages. The manufacturing process eliminates the need for sealing, making it easier to maintain. Quartz is stainless so you don’t have to worry about products like oil, tomatoes, wine, coffee and juice leaving marks.  Since its surface doesn’t hold bacteria or viruses, you can feel confident that even a light cleaning is sufficient. Finally, its heft and flexibility makes it stronger than granite and more resistant to chipping. When it comes to seams, darker colors tend to hide them better and give a great contemporary look. Although some feel quartz has less natural beauty than granite, many manufacturers like Cambria, LG Viatera and Silestone offer a variety of countertops with rich, finished stone appearances. Cornerstone Cabinet Company works with several fine manufacturers:                MS International                Silestone                Caesarstone                LG...

150 Shades of Gray

Did you know the trend towards gray interiors started in Scandinavia? It wasn’t until about six years ago when the color caught on in the United States. Rather than become passé, the popularity of gray continues to rise. According to Andrea Magno of Benjamin Moore, gray interiors are evolving and they’re seeing an increase of gray on cabinetry and trims. But picking the best shade of gray for your home can be tricky. Since grays have undertones of blue, purple or green, you’ll want the shade that’s compatible with the surrounding tiles, furnishings and fabrics. For instance, there’s a big difference between cool and warm grays.  Cool grays are better for modern interiors while warm grays work better in traditional homes. There’s also a middle ground often referred to as French grays. Traditionally trims around gray are lighter shades of gray or whites. Now we’re seeing more trims in the same or even a darker gray.  Laurie Pressman, vice president of the Pantone Color Institute agrees. She sees gray with gray trim as a trend and feels people should give more grays a chance. If you’re ready for gray walls, cabinets or trims, it’s best to get samples of your three favorite grays and paint a poster board with each one. Check them out over a period of one day (or more) to see how they appear in varying degrees of light. This way you get it right the first...