A Great White Kitchen

Kitchen trends come and go, but a white kitchen stands the test of time. It’s clean, fresh and adds resale value because it’s a blank slate for any new buyer to customize. White kitchens have a grand history. In the 1920s and 30s, white was the only color offered by manufacturers. White was associated with sanitation and health. Since it began keeping records, the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers reports that white appliances have consistently outsold all other colors. White also regularly tops the list of the most popular kitchen colors in the National Kitchen and Bath Association’s annual survey. Why white? As the brightest color, it makes even small kitchens seem spacious. It’s a great color to build upon with light fixtures, cabinet hardware, and tile accents. It’s easy to change elements around it whenever the mood strikes. It is applicable to traditional, contemporary, and transitional design styles. Because it’s a standard color for any manufacturer, white cabinets, tile, counters, faucets, sinks, and appliances are usually cheaper. All white kitchens can still have options. Appliances are offered in variations of white. Decorative white overlay panels can even cover existing stainless steel appliances. Countertops are available in a wide selection of white granite, quartz or marble. Some modern designers are even incorporating white concrete into their kitchen visions. Glass shelves or light colored wood can provide a little contrast without sacrificing the monochromatic theme, too. To keep a white kitchen from appearing boring, add interesting details like decorative bowls or baskets, detailed trim, and knick-knacks with character. Perhaps paint the ceiling or the kitchen island with a bold contrast...

Does “Lazy” Susan Do Justice To This Kitchen Accessory?

When it comes to corner-placed cabinetry, the best way to maximize your storage capacity is to install Lazy Susans. Not taking advantage of them will waste precious space and force you to search through the items in front to get what you want which is stored behind.  Lazy Susans make access to foods and kitchen utensils safer by bringing the items you need more often within easy reach. Consider them the smart spin on cabinet storage. You can customize your Lazy Susans by choosing one, two and three shelf configurations. They can also be ordered in various diameters to hold small to large appliances. Even small items like spice bottles are easier to separate and organize. No longer just plastic, the selection of materials varies from wood to polystyrene to wire chrome.  The next consideration is to choose from the configurations that range from full circle and D-shaped to half-moon and kidney shapes. It depends on what fits best for each cabinet configuration. Deciding how much you want to spend and how visible you want them to be will guide your selection also. Obviously Lazy Susans aren’t lazy, but if being able to reach whatever we need easily makes us “lazy” - so be it. Lazy Susans make kitchen tasks safer and allow us to indulge in all the kitchen gadgets we want without the guilt of where to store...

Modern Meets Farmhouse in the Kitchen

A bright white and light gray palette will give your kitchen a clean, modern feeling. Balance it out by channeling a homey vibe with rustic pendants, patterned rugs and a big farmhouse sink with a gooseneck faucet. Mixing the clean lines of modern design with nods to a rustic farmhouse aesthetic will give your kitchen a style that is fresh, comfortable and...

How Kitchen Islands Are Shaping The Future Of Kitchens

More than just expanding cabinet storage and countertop surfaces, kitchen islands have evolved into a gathering spot where family and guests hang around. Island design and comfort now draws cooks and visitors together to increase functionality, aesthetics and socialization. Along with food preparation and meals, kitchens are more open. Kids do homework and adults take care of paperwork. Additional activities like these promote family time as meals are prepared. For those whose children have moved away from home, this time goes to enjoying a glass of wine with guests before dinner gets to the table. And dinner is more likely to stay at the island with more comfortable seating. Still used for storage and counter space, islands also accommodate appliances like stoves with downward vents. And don’t forget about sinks where approximately 90% of the time is spent. The convenience of doing multiple tasks in one place shortens steps and work time. The ability to socialize more makes everything feel easier. Universal Design further expands function with varying countertop heights. This enables anyone at any height, especially children, to participate in food preparation and other activities without having to climb stools or reach overhead. Incorporating different materials from the rest of the kitchen adds even more appeal. One way is to use fabrics for surrounding stools and chairs. Fabrics contrast well with hard surfaces to soften the overall look. As a result, islands stand out as design objects and look more like furniture that seamlessly blends into the living room. The future will see more variation in island shapes and heights. Seating room will be expanded and rather than...

The Kitchen Island – How It Defines The Busiest Room In The House

There was a time when “kitchen islands” consisted of sturdy tables set in the center of the room and… only in kitchens large enough to accommodate them. In the 1930s, Frank Lloyd Wright brought kitchen islands to suburban homes with his “open plan” living space. They have continued to evolve ever since. Currently, the island has literally become the hub of our homes for doing more tasks than just cooking. They’ve become the center for socialization. If you’re looking to modify an island already in place or add one to your kitchen, it’s best to work with a professional to draw up a floor plan. An island should have about three feet of space around it. If it’s too large, the kitchen becomes crowded. Too small and not only does it not look good, it may not fit in with the normal workflow. Bottom line, it shouldn’t be too close to doors or other countertops but you don’t want it to be standing off by itself. The next consideration is how you want to use it. Islands can be strictly functional by providing additional countertop space and storage. But as suggested above, islands are where people interact. While the cook is chopping tomatoes, he can talk to family about their day, help the kids do homework, and just show off a little as guests nibble on appetizers as dinner is prepared.  This brings up the question of how many people do you want to be able to sit around it?  And do you want one level or two? Take a look at our Projects to see what we can...