150 Shades of Gray

Did you know the trend towards gray interiors started in Scandinavia? It wasn’t until about six years ago when the color caught on in the United States. Rather than become passé, the popularity of gray continues to rise. According to Andrea Magno of Benjamin Moore, gray interiors are evolving and they’re seeing an increase of gray on cabinetry and trims. But picking the best shade of gray for your home can be tricky. Since grays have undertones of blue, purple or green, you’ll want the shade that’s compatible with the surrounding tiles, furnishings and fabrics. For instance, there’s a big difference between cool and warm grays.  Cool grays are better for modern interiors while warm grays work better in traditional homes. There’s also a middle ground often referred to as French grays. Traditionally trims around gray are lighter shades of gray or whites. Now we’re seeing more trims in the same or even a darker gray.  Laurie Pressman, vice president of the Pantone Color Institute agrees. She sees gray with gray trim as a trend and feels people should give more grays a chance. If you’re ready for gray walls, cabinets or trims, it’s best to get samples of your three favorite grays and paint a poster board with each one. Check them out over a period of one day (or more) to see how they appear in varying degrees of light. This way you get it right the first...

5 Trending Accessories For Your Gourmet Kitchen

The kitchen is transitioning from just storage to functional storage solutions.  Homeowners want and expect modern conveniences and at Cornerstone Cabinet Company we are continuing to design with ease and function as a primary goal for your kitchen. Coffee Centers – This two tiered k-kup coffee organizer is used to organize your coffee and accessories. Pantry Storage – Pull out pantries are perfect for organizing and giving you the ability to see and reach those items in the back of the pantry. Base Cabinet – Pull Out This unit features two universal knife inserts, stainless steel utensil bin, and adjustable shelf for lower storage Roll Out Trash / Recycling Centers – Our most requested accessary is the trash/recycle center. There are many options to consider. You have multiple sizes to select from. They can even be designed into a corner. Blind Corner Pull Outs – Dead corners are no more! Here is a solution many feel is better than a lazy susan. The blind corner pull out gives you access, is functional and easy to use. I have to admit as a cabinet maker that I think the design and operation of the mechanisms are cool...

Kitchen Island Storage – How to Make The Most Out Of It

If you’ve just gotten a kitchen revamp then you’ll want to get the most of your new kitchen as you can. You want to make sure you have the Best Toaster, mixer, blender, utensils, etc. the finally give you the perfect kitchen. But how will you make sure everything is stored neatly away? Our previous article on kitchen islands focused on how the island has evolved from an extra table for food preparation to extended counter space that’s now a social hub. Not only do kitchen islands define the rest of the room, they supply easy-to-reach storage for regularly used items. When it comes to design, you can opt for utility, beauty or a combination of the two. Starting with utility, deep pull-out drawers are great for pot and pans. For small items – add customized shallow drawers to organize and store spices and small utensils. An increasingly popular option is drawers with mechanisms that lift smaller appliances. Normally tucked out of site, the mechanized ‘arms’ raise appliances like microwaves or toaster ovens to comfortable levels. The advantage is that these items are only visible when actually in use. If you want your island to be the focal hub for more than just cooking, consider un-kitchen items. Think about art supplies and homework necessities for the kids. Additionally, some homeowners use their kitchen as a mini-office to include taking care of tasks like bill paying. Too often people underestimate their storage needs. Before you start your remodel, think about how you cook, what activities and jobs take place and what gets used most often. And don’t forget the décor....

From kitchen to living room

As stated in “Banquette seating – will it work in your kitchen?” the trend in home design is to make the kitchen a place to gather, yet openly transition into other rooms. Kitchen islands play a key part as they go from food preparation countertop to banquette seating – making the transition seamless.   Any style is adaptable so it doesn’t matter if your home is industrial, modern, traditional or a fusion of something between. The way to pull it together is to coordinate…not match…the cabinetry you have in both areas.  Matching looks contrived. Coordination gives you more versatility and a natural feel. These days, farmhouse style is seeing a resurgence. This style is particularly easy to work with due to using a mix of antique finishes with a pallet of subtle colors. The same goes for rustic. Modern and industrial styles may present a little more challenge. Here the versatility of shaker cabinets offers a number of variations that tie rooms together. For example, a window seat with storage beneath may have wider or deeper frames and be a different but complementary color to the kitchen. The same can be done if you have cabinets surrounding a fireplace or beneath a buffet nook. Another way to coordinate any style is with glass doors and open shelves. A mix of these in both the kitchen and adjoining room could show off similar dishes or art collections. We tend not to think about having cabinets in the living area, yet they are the best way to store items you want to have handy but not always out in the open....

Sustainable Remodeling

Remodeling is a great option if you are living in an improved housing market. The effort to upgrade over moving feeds makes it economical to stay put longer and customize what you have. It’s why we work with high-quality companies…such as Oakcraft and Timberlake…to install cabinetry our clients can live with long term. Looks and efficiency still motivate changes. What’s under the surface determines ease-of-use and durability. It’s Better Business To Make Cabinets That Last Manufactured woods like particleboard reduce costs. But those savings are lost if they affect indoor air quality. Many manufacturers have removed urea-added formaldehyde to make them NAUF (No Added Urea Formaldehyde) compliant. But it’s possible they use other VOCs or volatile organic compounds that will gas-off over time. Another problem with particle board is that it doesn’t stand the test of time. Its mixture of sawdust and glue is more susceptible to moisture. While that may seem immaterial in a climate like ours, it needs to be factored in for cabinets placed near dishwashers, showers or hold sinks. Manufactured woods don’t hold hardware as well. They’re more likely to strip and chip than wood and plywood that can last 50 years. If you screw a hinge into hardwood, it will stay there until someone comes along to unscrew it. As unlikely as it is for people to live in their homes for 50 years, quality construction increases overall home value and factors into remodeling options. Another way to cut manufacturing costs is to glue and pin or staple drawers and shelve ends together. With a little investment, the better method is dovetail construction where...