Floating Cabinets Are The Rage! 

More and more designers are including floating vanities as part of their design.  Floating cabinets are suspended off the back wall and off the floor by approximately 10 inches. This can vary depending on design.  The front of a floating cabinet is suspended out from the wall 21 inches typically.  Make no mistake.  The weight of the cabinets is such that the front of the cabinet will push down, forcing the back of the cabinet away from the wall. You also have the weight of the sink and the counter top to consider. The cabinets are heavy and most cabinet manufacturers do not reinforce their cabinetry to compensate for the weight suspended away from the wall.  Some custom manufacturers integrate webbing into the design of the cabinet and are designed not to have the steel brackets.  There is just too much weight for the backs of the cabinets to withstand the downward gravity. We have seen many installation applications that have failed - metal straps or extra screws.  Cornerstone has engineered a steel bracket for the cabinets to sit on.  We professionally install our custom designed brackets regardless of the way the cabinets are manufactured.  Many designs incorporate the floor tile to transfer up the wall underneath the floating vanities.  Under cabinet lighting accentuates the luxury bath and can be integrated into the bottoms of your floating cabinetry.  There are also many moldings that can accentuate the floating cabinetry as well. Floating cabinets are stylish, sexy, contemporary, and can enhance the space of your bathroom.  With proper installation and design, a floating vanity can be the focal point of your...

A Kitchen Makeover

Remodeling your kitchen is a big decision. Cornerstone is always available to answer questions, help with the design and, of course, handle the installation. Here is an inspiring story! Reader Kitchen: A Kentucky Makeover for...

Garage Trends

With increased storage rents and bigger recreational vehicles, families require more space for belongings. Once regarded as extra covered space for the sedan and cardboard boxes, the trend in garages is to extend indoor living. In fact, according to Marketplace public radio, two thirds of all garages are not used for cars. Just like kitchens and bathrooms, re-modeled garages not only add efficiency to living space, they add curb-appeal and value to the home overall. Forget the particle board of big-box stores and tools hung on pegboard hooks. There’s no reason why your garage cabinets can’t be as elegant as your kitchen or bathroom. The Revolution in Garage Renovation Traditionally, if the garage was used for more than parking the car, it was a workbench for the home handyman or gardener. For the last couple of years, use of the garage has expanded and it’s gaining momentum. These days the garage may be the game room, used for a bar or pub, or a space to display collectables. Another popular trend is to make it the place where teens can have friends over and still have their privacy (and you can keep yours!). Finally, extending your living space into the garage is an expedient way to grow your space without having to move to larger home. Here’s some ideas on how to transform the room. Custom garage cabinetry does more than just beautify the garage. Well-fitted cabinetry protects belongings by keeping out dust and pests and comes in numerous sizes and styles. Customize your cabinets with clothing bars and cedar inside to preserve clothing. Use organized drawers for odds...

You Can Turn THAT Into A Bathroom Vanity?

When Chris Bolton, owner of Cornerstone Cabinet Company says he does custom work, he means it! So if you’re incorporating an unusual vanity in your bathroom, Cornerstone is the company to make it happen!  You Can Turn That Into a Bathroom Vanity     Photo by Michelle Fries, BeDe Design, LLC - Discover bathroom design...

Home Bars

Cornerstone Cabinet Company will help you design a custom home bar to fulfill your every dream! Here is some inspiration! Trending Now: Houzzers Raise a Glass to 15 New Home Bars Photo by Blackband Design - Browse home bar...

The Kitchen Island

When it comes to kitchen design, islands add style, personality, function; and come in multiple configurations. Is the client’s kitchen big enough for a stand-alone island, or will it only accommodate a peninsula? Do they want it built-in, or mobile?  So many choices can confuse homeowners making it crucial to ask them questions before anything goes on paper. What Clients Need (Or Just Want) From Their Kitchen Island The number one issue is function. Is the emphasis on food preparation, socialization, or a combination of the two? Will it house appliances? Sinks, under-counter refrigerators, and stove tops influence placement of other appliances to maximize activity flow and efficiency.  If a sink is embedded in the island, there needs to be room for a dishwasher on either side. If it’s the stove, they’ll need either a top mount or down-draft vent. The amount of food preparation influences the amount of storage needed. What and how many utensils need to be nearby and easily accessed? A number of factors determine countertop height - starting with seating and what types of bar stools are desired. Is this a place to snack, or will it replace the kitchen or dining room table? Do they prefer one or multiple countertop heights? Since kitchens are not static, traffic flow needs to be adequate. Architect Thomas Ahmann suggests three feet on either end and at least 42 inches on the working sides. Another consideration is passage when cabinet or appliance doors are open. How should it be lit? Pendant lighting is popular but some feel pendants interfere with the view. If the island has a stove,...

Quartz vs Soapstone

Quartz vs. Soapstone countertops As we stated in ‘Quartz Counter’ (Mar 9, 2016), Quartz leads the race in countertop materials. As kitchen designs evolve, brands like Silestone, Caesarstone, and Cambria, open options to clients seeking their personal imprint.  Alternatively, Soapstone provides an option for natural material. Granite and marble may be receding, but they aren’t dead.  But Quartz and Soapstone have distinct characteristics and advantages that suit our clients’ changing needs. The best fit is determined by what’s most important to them. Quartz and soapstone enhance ease of use The term ‘sealant’ evokes the idea of chemicals. The non-porous surfaces of both Quartz and Soapstone appeal to clients as less work and environmentally friendly. Other advantages to non-porous surfaces are: Stain resistance. Scratch resistance. Heat resistance. Resistant to bacteria. Bacterial resistance can be a huge selling point for clients with kids and grandkids. Capturing the right kitchen design and usage When color is critical, Quartz offers more options to blend or contrast with the neutral paint shades that are currently so popular. Manufactured materials have the added advantage of uniform appearance that allows pieces to butt up to each other to make seams almost invisible. On the other hand, soapstone appeals to those who value the natural look. It can be quarried in the US, but Brazilian soapstone has the same type of veining as marble. Coming from nature limits the color choices and it’s best for those desiring gray to black surfaces. Although not required, rubbing soapstone with mineral oil darkens the color. This is definitely not the choice for a colorful kitchen and requires working with one...