Review

Chris and Vincent - I just wanted to take a minute and thank you both for the work you’ve done in creating, designing and installing the drawers for our master bath.  I can’t tell you how happy my wife is with the results.  We turned what was a very challenging space into something that looks great and is very functional. Now we just have to figure out what to do with the giant countertop in the middle 🙂 Thanks again.  Mike ...

When Two Kitchen Islands Are Better Than One

The trend towards large kitchens continues to grow. More than simply meal preparation, modern kitchens now have specialized food and drink preparation stations. Even more important, kitchens are the focal point for more friends and family interaction. All of these features require more countertop space which leads to larger kitchen islands. If this describes your home, think in terms of having two kitchen islands instead of one. With the right layout and configuration, dividing one large island into two improves traffic function and flow. When it comes to function, two islands divide the work stations so that food preparation and clean up are more efficient. For example, set up one island exclusively for food preparation. The other island houses the sink and dishwasher for clean up. Or divide islands to separate the work station while the second island is a bistro style for others to eat and socialize. And there’s no reason why the islands have to match. Contrast them with one open underneath and the other lined with cabinets to organize and store kitchen items in one place. You may host events where one island is needed to create an elongated buffet. Sometimes an extra large work area is necessary. Consider a drop leaf that connects one to the other. The biggest advantage to two islands is to facilitate traffic control, especially in busy kitchens. One big island forces traffic around it. Two smaller islands create an additional route for everyone to move about.  It also shortens steps from one side to another.  Dividing a big island into two is one way to transform your kitchen. Before you...

Your Farmhouse Sink Faucet

Once you’ve decided a Farmhouse Sink fits your kitchen style, you now have a number of options to customize this critical area.    Previously in our article - “Farmhouse sinks gain popularity”; we discussed the characteristics that differentiate Farmhouse Sinks from modern ones. We included additional features to consider before you purchase. “Different materials customize Farmhouse sinks.” reviews a number of options of materials to choose from – including the pros and cons of each. Now let’s look at the options for placing hardware:  Is there a best location? The three ways to mount hardware are on the sink itself, the surrounding deck, and on the wall. As the name suggests, sink mounted hardware has holes drilled into the sink itself. The type of hardware, either single or double handed, determines the number of holes needed. Single handed faucets with the water temperature and pressure in one assembly only require one hole. Double handed faucets with the water controls separated from the faucet need three. If you add an additional faucet (maybe one for filtered water) it can go up to four. But suppose you fall in love with a collector’s sink that already has holes? Or want to change the faucet style in the future without giving up the sink? If your change requires fewer holes, you can use an escutcheon plate (deck plate at the base) to cover the one(s) you no longer need. Deck-mounted faucets put the hardware in the countertop surrounding the sink - a style well suited to contemporary kitchens. With this option, be careful of how water, dirt, and grime accumulate between the...